L Safe Third Country Agreement

L Safe Third Country Agreement

Concerns have been raised about the lack of security legislation for refugee protection in the United States. This security problem and argument give refugees legitimate reasons to turn around in Canada to lead a better life. On December 29, 2005, a group of refugee and human rights organizations (in Canada and the United States) launched legal action against the U.S. claim as a safe third country for asylum seekers. This action was supported by prominent figures such as Justice Michael Phelan of the Federal Court of Canada on November 29, 2007 and many others. In practical terms, the legislation requires that the revision of a designated country be based on the following four factors: so far, the United States is the only service country classified as a safe third country. According to media reports, the United States intends to sign agreements with Mexico and Guatemala – perhaps as early as today – of the latest phase of the Trump administration`s efforts to prevent Central American asylum seekers from reaching the country. Such agreements prohibit asylum claims in the United States from thousands of people fleeing El Salvador and Honduras, as well as from other parts of the world who cross Central America and Mexico to reach our border. They would violate both U.S. and international law to protect asylum seekers. The Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) requires ongoing review of all countries designated as safe third countries. The purpose of the review procedure is to ensure that the conditions that led to deportation as a safe third country remain met.

Under the Third Country Security Agreement, in effect since December 2004, Canada and the United States declare the other country safe for refugees and close the door to most refugees at the U.S.-Canada border. To date, the United States is the only country designated by Canada as a safe third country under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. Ahmed Hussen, speaking as Canada`s minister of the IRCC, said the terms of the safe-third country agreement remained met. The ruling Liberal Party of Canada has not indicated any plans or intentions to suspend the agreement. [21] The agreement was signed on December 5, 2002 in Washington, D.C. by Bertin Cété (Vice-Chief of Mission, Canadian Embassy) and Arthur E. Dewey (Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees and Migration, U.S.